Posted in Art and Design

Capri Blue

They say that colors are evocative, prompting vivid memories or images of things. Psychologists tell us colors have the ability to create deep emotional responses and that the vividness and combination of colors affect our moods. By manipulating and controlling colors artists can contribute to the overall feeling and visual impact of their work.

Italy is a country filled with the attraction of color.  Each meal in Italy is a work of art; with passion, freshness and flavors the brush strokes and history the canvas. Each landscape, monument and painting imprints on the psyche of the traveler colors that bring back memories of the trip . The intense ruby-red of a Brunello, the earthy terra-cotta of a Tuscany farmhouse, the grey-green silver leaves of the olive trees and the fire-red orange of flames grilling a bistecca are color memories linked to times, places and people that have made my travels in Italy so memorable. Yet, for me, Italy as an artist is at her best when she draws her brush strokes in blue. Smokey, vibrant, veined in stone or marble, mare or azurri, blue is the color that represents the revolution that united Italy.

My best use of Italian blue – the classic Capri Blue motocicletta

 

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Author:

Pamela Marasco is the founder and owner of The Cositutti Group, a travel and lifestyle resource for the food, wine, art and design of Northern Italy, Tuscany and Umbria where she travels extensively with her Italian family and friends taste testing regional Italian food for CosituttiMarketPlace.com, a unique on-line shopping experience that connects you to the authentic flavors of the Italy. With an undergraduate degree in the biological sciences and a graduate degree in education, Pam is committed to farming practices and educational programs that ensure the true flavors of Italy are preserved and protected. You can learn more about her travels in Italy at www.cositutti.com. Her recent books include Seeing and Savoring Italy - A Taste and Travel Journey through Northern Italy, Tuscany and Umbria and Pasta for a Princess. She also teaches on-line classes for the IUPUI School of BioInformatics / Human-Centering Computing/ Library and Information Science.

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