Posted in Lifestyle, The Foods of Italy

Pizza a libretto

libretto- foldAccording to the Decalogue of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana  a/k/a the 10 Commandments of Pizza, a true Neapolitan Pizza can be recognized by several distinguishing characteristics. Like the libretto (text) of an opera, the libretto of a pizza speaks volumes about that slice of pizza you are about to put in your mouth.

The libretto or the way a slice folds is one of the peculiarities of a true Italian pizza. The dough, the ingredients, the stretching techniques, cooking aroma, appearance and the libretto are all features of a true Neapolitan Pizza. With true Italian style and attention to detail the crust exposed by folding the pizza must be “1-2 cm high, even and puffed up, golden in color and with a very few burns and bubbles”. As far as a Neapolitan pizza is concerned, you want to see a lightly blistered crust yet without strong burns. The libretto checks the part underneath. pizza crust

If New York City is a measure of how most Americans eat their pizza than a poll taken by Slice  shows that over 60% prefer pizza a libretto. Folding their pizza more for convenience than a peak at the crust. Whether you eat pizza a taglia, (pizza in hand sold by the slice as in Rome) or a combination of knife and fork and hands and fold as an uncut single whole pie served in pizzerie all over Italy – don’t forget to check the way your crust folds.  Textured, slightly springy, golden in color with a smoky flavor, slight char and lightly blistered crust, part of an individual work of art and an authentic taste of Italy.

 

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Author:

Pamela Marasco is the founder and owner of The Cositutti Group, a travel and lifestyle resource for the food, wine, art and design of Northern Italy, Tuscany and Umbria where she travels extensively with her Italian family and friends taste testing regional Italian food for CosituttiMarketPlace.com, a unique on-line shopping experience that connects you to the authentic flavors of the Italy. With an undergraduate degree in the biological sciences and a graduate degree in education, Pam is committed to farming practices and educational programs that ensure the true flavors of Italy are preserved and protected. You can learn more about her travels in Italy at www.cositutti.com. Her recent books include Seeing and Savoring Italy - A Taste and Travel Journey through Northern Italy, Tuscany and Umbria and Pasta for a Princess. She also teaches on-line classes for the IUPUI School of BioInformatics / Human-Centering Computing/ Library and Information Science.

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