The White Ghost of Pasta

pasta al denteAmericans just don’t get pasta. They cook it and eat it all wrong. They vilify its nutritional benefits. They overcook it, over sauce it, over eat it and in doing so miss out on one of the truly great foods of the world. This versatile, healthy, satisfying food is misused and abused and yet keeps coming back for more as an all time favorite international ingredient.

True Italian pasta made by traditional, low-temperature, artisanal methods from wheat grown to regional specifications is a very precise art that produces more than a slippery mound of noodles drowning in a sea of sauce. To achieve the level of perfection that pasta is capable of you must prepare, serve and eat it correctly.

Preparing Pasta

Preparing pasta required lots of water – salted water. A one-pound box of pasta, about six servings, needs to cook in at least five quarts of vigorously boiling, salted water. Cramming a beautifully made pasta into a small saucepan is a little like asking a Ferrari to race on a go-kart track. Basically an invitation for disaster. In this case the unfortunate consequences are likely to be a gummy, overcooked pasta.

Recommended cooking times on a package or box of artisan pasta will generally give you good results if you follow the directions on pot size and amount of water. Experienced pasta makers look for the “white ghost”. When you cut into a strand of cooked spaghetti, it will appear cooked through, except for a white ghost, a tiny spot of not-quite-rawness, at the center of the strand. This is what is generally referred to as pasta al dente. It’s pasta that is tender but still retains a pleasant, slightly chewy texture. Timing, testing, draining, saucing and serving immediately ensures that your pasta is done right.

When preparing pasta reserve about 1 cup of pasta cooking water before draining. Drain loosely to keep the pasta moist. Never rinse the pasta, unless you’re using the pasta later and want to keep it from sticking. Add reserved pasta water slowly, a tablespoon at a time, to your saucepan with hot pasta and sauce. Combining the pasta and sauce in the pot not on the plate ensures a evenly sauced pasta with a consistent temperature and flavor .

Serving Pasta

In Italy pasta is eaten alone. It is considered to be a primo piatto, the first course followed by everything else. It is not a side dish nor does it have a side dish with it. Pairing your pasta with the right sauce is critical. Generally, larger pasta shapes work better with thick, robust sauces while skinny shapes, like vermicelli, suit light, seafood or cream sauces. Long ribbons of pasta go well with rich meaty sauces; think Bolognese. Twists with smoother sauces like pesto.

Know when to add cheese and when to leave it off. There are certain pasta combinations Italians do not use cheese on like those made with fish or seafood. As far as serving pasta on a plate versus a bowl, traditionally pasta was served on a plate or a shallow bowl (piatto fondo) that offers a curved surface against which to press the tines of the fork when capturing a bite.

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