You Can’t Keep a Good Church Down

 

San Geminiano Church
San Geminiano Church – Venice (Canaletto c. 1723-4)

The Church of San Geminiano in Venice has faced many challenges. One of great architectural  churches of Venice it has been destroyed and rebuilt several times in the course of its history. Located in Piazza San Marco, on the opposite side to the Basilica, it was among the most decorated churches of Venice in the 16th century and displayed paintings by a number of prominent artists including Tintoretto and Veronese. Described in a book of the time by Francesco Sansovino as “being lavishly decorated within and encrusted with marble and Istrian stone on the outside, extremely rich and well-conceived in design, judged by everyone to be almost like a ruby among pearls”.

Now one of the lost churches of Venice, history records it to have been first built on the site in the sixth century as a gift to Venice by the Byzantine general Narses for help given by the Venetians at the siege of Ravenna. 

The up and down history of the destruction and rebuilding of San Geminiano was effected by a series of fires, natural disasters and human whims that began in 976. In the early 13th century the church was again brought down as part of a major work on the Palazzo Ducale directed by Doge Sebastiano Ziani. The church was demolished by the Doge as it was right in the middle of the planned piazza.

During the the French occupation of the city in 1807 the church was again demolished by Napoleon to make room for the staircase of Napoleon’s Palazzo Reale.  In the Handbook for Travelers in Northern Italy published in 1842, the author wrote that the destruction of San Geminiano was an example of “Gallic vandalism” as many of the works of art inside the church were either lost or scattered between Italy and other countries, placed in other churches or sold to private collectors.

 

The Angel Foretelling Saint Catharine of Her Martyrdom
Tintoretto’s The Angel Foretelling Saint Catharine of Her Martyrdom

It is reported that an altarpiece from the church, Tintoretto’s The Angel Foretelling Saint Catharine of Her Martyrdom, had been bought by David Bowie in 1987. After his death in 2016 it was acquired by an unnamed European collector. It will return to Venice for the 2019 Biennale for an exhibition at the Palazzo Ducale. Following the exhibition, the altarpiece will remain in the Doge’s Palace on long-term loan. Proving that you can’t keep a good church, or in this case its altarpiece, down.

 

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